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Place Name Poem


I have always loved the sound of indigenous place names, -small and large towns with rich sounding addresses, sprinkled throughout Australia. They have a strong lyrical and quite unique sound. Such places have inspired this rhyming poem. My travels may have been stretching belief geographically, but it was fun to make a poem incorporating these great words originating from the languages of Australia's first people. 





Visitations

On Monday

Drove to Chinkapook
Stopped a while
To take a look
On Tuesday,
Zipped to Geelong
Scanned the harbour
-But didn't stay long.
On Wednesday,
Traveled to Boggabri
Bought some cheese
-Not sure why.
On Thursday, 
Drove through Yackandandah
Flowers were blooming
So I took a gander.
On Friday, 
Arrived in Mollymook
Found a shop,
Bought a book.
On Saturday 
Was in Woolloomoloo
Couldn't believe it 
-so were you!
On Sunday
I stayed home.
-Didn't travel
-Didn't roam.



Comments

  1. What a fun jaunt of a poem! Thanks for taking us along.

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    1. Glad you could make it Molly. Pleased you enjoyed the ride.

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  2. Those are fun place names! And a fun poem to include them all.

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    1. Thanks Kay. It was fun in the making too.

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  3. Love all these place names--this is a great one to read aloud!

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    1. Thank you Buffy. They are certainly full of charm and easy on the ear. Might try recording it...

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  4. I love all those place names, too. How light-hearted and fun.

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    1. Thank you Brenda. Light-hearted, I like that description.

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  5. Fun! Students would love this one. Here's a super challenge for you: Welsh place names! Llantwit Fardre, Lampeter, Llanbradach , Llangranog, Laugharne, Llandeilo, Llandovery, Llandrindod Wells, Llandudno, Llanddulas, Llandysul, Llanelli, Llanfair Caereinion, Llanfairfechan, Llanfyllin, Llangefni, Llangollen, Llanidloes, Llanrwst, Llantrisant, Llantwit Major, Llanwrtyd Wells, Llanybydder, Loughor, Llanishen. GO!-- Christie @ https://wonderingandwondering.wordpress.com/blog/

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    1. Now, you have really set me a challenge Christie. Might need some time on that one though. Not totally sure regarding pronunciations.

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  6. What a fun poem, Alan, and so imaginative.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Carol. Fun in the making I can assure you.

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