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Compound Interest POEM


I cannot claim credit for thinking of this idea, but I have had a lot of fun making this poem using compound words. I have used the words to sing the praises of someone special in my life- my wife, Vicki. I invite you to try this simple, yet effective approach to writing poetry. It is a fine example of word play. In this case playing with compound words. Poetry fun to share...




Compound Interest

You are the jingle in my bells
The tick in my tock
The flash in my light
The spring in my time
The whirl in my wind
The tell in my tale
You are the ever in my lasting
The ginger in my bread
The life in my boat
It has to be said









Comments

  1. Fantastic! Love this idea and poem. :)

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  2. Replies
    1. So pleased to hear this. I loved 'making' it too.

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  3. What a fun idea! Adding that to the list. Thanks! -- Christie @ https://wonderingandwondering.wordpress.com/

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    1. always happy to share an idea Christie. Have fun with it. Make discoveries.

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  4. Nice to meet you, Alan--I don't think I've realized who you are, though I've heard your name often! This approach does something interesting to metaphor and I'm looking forward to trying it! I like all your choices of compound words.

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    1. Nice to meet you to Heidi. Glad you found something you can try for yourself.

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  5. This is wonderful, a created new and special love poem. I love the "ever in my lasting", Alan.

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    1. Thanks Linda. The 'everlasting' line was a special find.

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  6. That is fun wordplay! I love how playful your love poem is. Hmmm....maybe I should write one for my husband's birthday tomorrow!

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    1. There you go Kay. Birthday gift coming up!

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  7. I love this playful love poem. Such fun!

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    1. As you say Brenda, it was both playful and most definitely fun to create a poem in this way.

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  8. Fun twist with your compound word-poem Alan, I hear music to it too–Cole Porter or the like . . . Thanks!

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    1. Thanks Michelle. It's pleasing that you hear the music.

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