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The BURP Poem

Sometimes a single word can  spark an idea for creating poetry. So upon hearing a man burp/belch while walking along the street a couple of days ago, I began to ponder the word burp. A poet can never be sure what will spark an idea, but it pays to be ready when inspiration strikes.


When I was growing burping was not something my parents approved of. It was always considered socially unacceptable or simply bad manners to make such noises. however I also learned that in some cultures, notably Chinese and Indian, burping was regarded as acceptable in certain situations.

Burping after a meal can be seen as a sign of appreciation, and being well fed. In  other cultures such as Japan, Northern America and Europe, burping during a meal is considered bad manners.

Burping is probably one of those inappropriate things that we also find funny. To hear a loud burp suddenly emerge from a baby is something most of us consider quite amusing. It's hard not to laugh. Some people possess the special ability to burp on command. Never been able to do that myself. -More of a party trick than a useful skill,I would think.

Anyway, all this talk and thought about the word BURP lead me to my latest poem. I felt somewhat irreverent and naughty writing this poem, but what fun I had too. It was a poem that suddenly emerged without much warning- somewhat like a BURP.

Soup On Sunday Night
One Sunday night at our place
The family gathered round
Mum made Minestrone soup
And we ate like hungry hounds

Mum and Dad and Grandma
Uncle Dave and Grace
Me, and little sister Meg
Bowls and spoons in place

You could hear the clinking of the spoons
Slurps and swallows too
Such a winter warmer
With plenty for me -and you.

Then from the head of the table
Grandma rose from her chair.
We all put down our soupy spoons
And at her we did stare.

From her mouth did tumble
Not a single word,
But instead the biggest, loudest BURP
That we had ever heard.

It rattled the windows.
It slammed shut the door.
I doubt that a burp
Has ever done more.

The table lamp flickered.
The cat dashed for cover.
We all looked aghast
Especially, Mother. 

We stared in amazement
At what had beset her.
But Grandma just smiled  
And announced- Ah, that feels better!








Comments

  1. I suspect I taught middle school for too long because I find burps funny--and your poem, too. Thank you for bringing a smile and laugh today. I'm not in too much control of my burps, but I had a friend in college who could burp recognizable songs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's okay to find burps funny Kay. Secretly most of us do. To be able to burp songs is a rare talent.

      Delete
  2. I had heard that in some cultures burping is a compliment. As a K teacher, I constantly stifle my own giggles at some of the burping that takes place in my classroom! :-) -- Christie @ https://wonderingandwondering.wordpress.com/blog/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In junior classrooms there are numerous unexplained noises Christie and stifling a smile, a smirk or an audible laugh can prove quite difficult.

      Delete
  3. This made me laugh! My mother had a funny thing she would say upon burping.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad you got a laugh from my poem Jone. You've left me hanging regarding your mother...

      Delete
  4. Fun poem, those naughty society no-nos are often great for inspiration!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I so agree Michelle. We all like to thumb our noses at polite society occasionally.

      Delete
    2. I so agree Michelle. We all like to thumb our noses at polite society occasionally.

      Delete

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