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When Poetry Visits The Traveller

I really enjoy the poems that emerge from my immediate engagement with places I visit.

When a poem arises from visiting a particular place, it is a joy for my poet's heart. I have written before about the 'poetry of place.' I recognise its strong influence on my writing. I look forward to the words that come flooding my way.

This little poem came to me during my very recent trip to Vietnam. It was a response to the morning skies that greeted me in the city of Hanoi. I stepped out and into the busy streets of the city's bustling old quarter and the skies above me were brooding, grey and heavy with expectation.It was all set up for me to notice- and I embraced the moment.

I encourage all young poets to be open to poetry ideas related to place. Ideas frequently present themselves whenever we do some mindful meandering in new or unfamiliar places. We must remain open to possibilities, wherever we go in this world.


Hanoi Morning
The sky
Seamless
Grey
Drapes itself suffocatingly
Over…

Some Actions That Could Inspire Poetry

Some Actions That COULD inspire the writing of Poetry
Everyday actions can provide rich potential for creating poetry. Here is a list of actions that might prove helpful in finding those special words. Remember, poetry is writing our best words in tight spaces to create some sparks!

Putting gel or wax in your hair Blowing bubbles Trying on an older persons shoes Baking with a Grandparent Reading a whole book in day Snuggling into bed on a winter’s evening Playing kick to kick in the park Riding your bike through puddles Eating a crisp juicy apple Observing leaves falling Watching the effect of the wind Practicing something over and over until you master it Trying to put on clothing that is a bit small for you Falling asleep with your pet nearby Walking on the beach in winter Helping someone without being asked Noticing cold air on your face Finding a long lost treasure from your younger days Discovering a piece of ephemera (ticket, note, etc.) inside a book Reading a book you find yourself lost in Shopping…

Compound Interest POEM

I cannot claim credit for thinking of this idea, but I have had a lot of fun making this poem using compound words. I have used the words to sing the praises of someone special in my life- my wife, Vicki. I invite you to try this simple, yet effective approach to writing poetry. It is a fine example of word play. In this case playing with compound words. Poetry fun to share...



Compound Interest
You are the jingle in my bells The tick in my tock The flash in my light The spring in my time The whirl in my wind The tell in my tale You are the ever in my lasting The ginger in my bread The life in my boat It has to be said








ORDER I Bet There's No Broccoli On The Moon @Book Depository

Just a reminder, poetry people, you can order my latest poetry book, I Bet There's No Broccoli On The Moon onlinefrom Book Depository, right now. 

Just click the link below to go there.

Order The Broccoli Book HERE!

In this second anthology of adventurous verse for young poetry lovers, I am celebrating everything from pirates to pink pyjamas. 

My aim is to take poetry lovers all ages on a delightful, poetic journey through the far reaches of my experience. 

Within the pages of this book you'll find poems popping with life and laughter. You will discover among other things, my strong need for breakfast cereal, the very scary -Miss Dungeon, the perils of playing Kiss Chasey, and the joy of playing cricket in the park. 

I hope you will find I Bet There's No Broccoli on the Moon  is a fun collection of poetry. Poetry exploring, the joys of life, the adventures of Martina the astronaut, and why the world is full of silly songs.


Place Name Poem

I have always loved the sound of indigenous place names, -small and large towns with rich sounding addresses, sprinkled throughout Australia. They have a strong lyrical and quite unique sound. Such places have inspired this rhyming poem. My travels may have been stretching belief geographically, but it was fun to make a poem incorporating these great words originating from the languages of Australia's first people. 




Visitations

On Monday
Drove to Chinkapook
Stopped a while
To take a look
On Tuesday,
Zipped to Geelong
Scanned the harbour
-But didn't stay long.
On Wednesday,
Traveled to Boggabri
Bought some cheese
-Not sure why.
On Thursday, 
Drove through Yackandandah
Flowers were blooming
So I took a gander.
On Friday, 
Arrived in Mollymook
Found a shop,
Bought a book.
On Saturday 
Was in Woolloomoloo
Couldn't believe it 
-so were you!
On Sunday
I stayed home.
-Didn't travel
-Didn't roam.



The BURP Poem

Sometimes a single word can  spark an idea for creating poetry. So upon hearing a man burp/belch while walking along the street a couple of days ago, I began to ponder the word burp. A poet can never be sure what will spark an idea, but it pays to be ready when inspiration strikes.


When I was growing burping was not something my parents approved of. It was always considered socially unacceptable or simply bad manners to make such noises. however I also learned that in some cultures, notably Chinese and Indian, burping was regarded as acceptable in certain situations.

Burping after a meal can be seen as a sign of appreciation, and being well fed. In  other cultures such as Japan, Northern America and Europe, burping during a meal is considered bad manners.

Burping is probably one of those inappropriate things that we also find funny. To hear a loud burp suddenly emerge from a baby is something most of us consider quite amusing. It's hard not to laugh. Some people possess the special a…

Celebrating Hilaire Belloc With A Little Caution

Today I want to celebrate the poetry of Hilaire Belloc, another poet I recall from my school days. Our teachers often read his poems to us to remind us to behave ourselves otherwise horrid things might befall us. Apart from intriguing poems, with such a distinctive name, Hilaire Belloc was hard to forget.

Born near Paris, France, on July 27, 1870, Hilaire Belloc was raised in England, but remained a French citizen until 1902. 

He is best known for his poetry anthology, ‘Cautionary Tales for Children (1907) 
It was a collection of satirical tales of caution based on the popular tales of the 19th century. Belloc wrote his cautionary poems in rhyming couplets. They were gruesome and funny at the very same time. Many of the children appeared to have a strong wicked streak about them. 

Belloc is also known for his illustrated 1896 children’s book, ‘The Bad Child's Book of Beasts.’ It was a collection of poems that gave humourous advice to children. The book sold over 4000 copies, which was…

Short and Sweet Poems

Let's Hear It For Short Poems!
Sometimes a poem can prove effective even though it is short in length. As a poet I appreciate poems of every length and style, but just for today I want to focus on the short and sweet version.

A short poem needs to have some punch, and because they employ so few words, word choice is particularly important.

One of my favourite short poems comes from the late and great Spike Milligan who wrote this clever little poem:

A Silly Poem

Said Hamlet to Ophelia
I'll write a poem to thee
What kind of pencil shall I use?
2B or not 2B?

I also like Lillian Moore's poem, Red. It employs a simile in a most effective way.

Red

All day
across the way
on someone's sill
a geranium glows
red bright
like a
tiny
faraway 
traffic light

I can't imagine Shel Silverstein not having fun writing this short, but very funny poem.

Anteater
"A genuine anteater,"
The pet man told me dad.
Turned out, it was an aunt eater

And now my uncle's mad!

So now I share with you dear reade…

Inspired by Walter de la Mare

Walter de la Mare's book of poetry for children, 'Peacock Pie' was first published in 1913. I have a copy of this anthology that was republished in 1962. 

Walter de la Mare (1873 - 1956) was a British author of diverse talent who wrote everything from poetry to horror stories to children's books. His writing focused around the themes of childhood, imagination, and the supernatural. 

During my school days I recall being introduced to Walter de la Mare's poetry and a lot of it has stuck, which is a sure sign that his words made a connection. I particularly liked the poems, 'Five Eyes' and 'Silver' which are reproduced below.

Five Eyes

Walter de la Mare

In Hans' old Mill his three black cats
Watch the bins for the thieving rats.
Whisker and claw, they crouch in the night,
Their five eyes smouldering green and bright:
Squeaks from the flour sacks, squeaks from where
The cold wind stirs on the empty stair,
Squeaking and scampering, everywhere.
Then down they pou…

Time To Skedaddle Poem

Using Colloquial Phrases and Idioms In Poetry
Idiom:
An expression whose meaning is not predictable from the usual meanings of its words, as in kick the bucket (meaning to die). 

Colloquialisms:
A colloquialism is a word, phrase, or other form used in informal language. Such words and phrases develop and become part of the every day language. Strangely most people know exactly what they mean. The word, 'yobbo or yob' was used frequently when I was younger. The word was applied to young men considered to be poorly dressed, bad mannered and uneducated.

Certain phrases and words expressions may develop in a particular language, dialect, or style of speaking. These terms may be used in conversation and writing in a particular country, state or region yet may be unknown to people living beyond that place, who remain unfamiliar with its use. Idioms and colloquialisms are continually being invented, while others fall out of use because they may have connections to a particular point in ti…

A Blast From Poetry Past

ABlast From POETRY PAST
I have written previously about the joy of rummaging. Well, today I did some more,- rummaging that is and it paid dividends. It seemed most appropriate on Poetry Friday.  

I uncovered a collection of long forgotten poems I wrote many years ago. -More than thirty years ago to be precise. 

This was my first anthology of poems. All hand written on pieces of card and presented in a spiral bound book format. I recall creating this book primarily for my children and my students at that time. 

Reconnecting with these early poems again was like seeing ghosts from my past. It was both thrilling and confronting. Confronting because the poems turned out to be much older than I first recollected. 

It was so good to reconnect and reread those historic words. It was a feeling akin to unearthing a pirate’s treasure. I got such a buzz revisiting work from this earlier phase of my writing life. I now have some new-old poems to reshape and consider. 

I now present a couple of those pr…